Brew Day: American Amber Lager (w/cereal-mashed grits)

January 7, 2014 by Jack

I brewed on Sunday. It was the first time since a month ago when Jess and I co-brewed a 10 gallon batch of triple-decocted German Pilsner. I was supposed to brew this beer last weekend with a handful of non-brewer friends who I won’t see again until April, at which time we’d tap the kegs. Something came up and that get-together had to be canceled. The harvested yeast wasn’t getting any fresher, so I brewed.

Today’s beer was 10 gallons of an American amber lager. It’s not a BJCP-style beer, just something I wanted to brew to share with friends. Here’s my recipe:

  • 36.2% US 2-Row
  • 36.2% Munich
  • 13.6% Flaked Maize
  • 9.0% Grits
  • 2.3% C40
  • 2.3% C60
  • 21g (20.5 IBU) German Magnum 13.5% AA @ 60 min.
  • 28g (9.1 IBU) Tettnang 4.5% AA @ 60 min.
  • 14g Liberty 4.3% AA @ 15 min.
  • 14g Perle 8% AA @ 15 min.
  • 14g Liberty 4.3% AA @ 2 min.
  • 14g Perle 8% AA @ 2 min.
  • 90 minute boil
  • 1.056 Target OG
  • 35 IBU
  • 9.1 SRM
  • Step Mash: 20 min @ 125F, 60 min @ 150F, 10 min @ 168F
  • WLP830 German Lager, WLP838 Souther German Lager (split batch)

I designed the recipe with 5 lbs of flaked maize. But I accidentally only ordered 3. A friend grabbed the other two for me and was going to bring them to the brew day last week. Since I never got the corn from him, and since it was just me brewing (meaning I didn’t need to stick to a short single-infusion brew day), I improvised and grabbed some de-germinated grits at the grocery store. Minimally grits need to be boiled prior to mashing. Ideally they should be cereal-mashed. I had the time, so I went ahead and tried a cereal mash. It was straightforward, but was kind of a pain in the ass. To the 2 pounds of grits I added 5 ounces (about 15% of the grits’ weight) of crushed 2-row and mixed them in a pot with enough water to form a thin porridge. I heated it to 158, left it there for probably 15 minutes while milling my grain, etc., then raised it to a boil, where it was held for a half an hour. Like a decoction, it needed constant stirring as long as the flame was under it. I found I needed to add a cup of boiling water to the grits about four times during the boil to thin it back out. Once done, I ran about 2 quarts of the wort from the mash tun into the grits pot and stirred it in to aid in pouring the grits into the mash and avoid having grit-balls in the mash tun.

The corn-like aroma from the boiling grits hung heavy in the kitchen. It was a summertime smell, half-way between fresh corn on the cob and the “used corn” smell of a pig sty. It had a certain “country” quality to it. Hopefully this lends a prominent corn aroma & flavor to the finished beer without coming across as DMS. I think I might try the process again for a cream ale. That time I’ll skip the flaked maize altogether and go with a big batch of grits in the mash.


Whirlpool kettle allows for a nice hop cone to form in the concave bottom.

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